Education Project Profiles

Colleges and universities showcase a variety of architecture, juxtaposing old and new, representing their growth over the decades. As institutions evolve, student centers take on new and varied responsibilities, serving as the hub of student life; cafes, bookstores, meeting areas, banks, copy centers and food courts often neighbor one another. These facilities can provide a contemporary, comfortable and energy-efficient way for student center to serve their purpose while taking a proactive approach to sustainability. Below you’ll find several project profiles showcasing innovative and inventive retrofit projects aimed at revitalizing educational facilities which originally appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of retrofit.

Project Profiles

PROJECT: The Law Commons, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.

TEAM: Project owner: The University of Arizona, Tempe, www.arizona.edu // Architect: Gould Evans Associates, Phoenix, www.gouldevans.com // Construction manager: Hensel Phelps, Phoenix, www.henselphelps.com // Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing engineer: Bridgers & Paxton, Phoenix, www.bpce.com // Structural engineer: Paragon Structural Design Inc., Phoenix, www.paragonstr.com // Civil engineer: GLHN, Tucson, www.glhn.com // Landscape Architect: Wheat Scharf, Tucson, www.wheatscharf.com // Manufacturer: Hunter Douglas Contract, www.hunterdouglascontract.com

Transforming the Law Commons from a dark, dungeon-like building into a modern, naturally lit, open space that students would want to spend time in was an important goal during the renovation planning. By using a central stairwell and light well, as well as replacing some interior and exterior walls with glass, the team was able to bring natural light to all three floors. To control all the sunlight, Aerobrise Sun Louvers by Hunter Douglas were used to shade the patio outside and block some of the sun entering the building during the day. Raising the ceilings to further enhance daylighting, Hunter Douglas’ Natura Classic Ceiling panels and Box Series metal ceilings were used throughout the spaces along with TechStyle Classic (Clipped) Ceilings.

The entryway represents the most distinctive feature of the renovation. Visitors walk under a canopy created by the sun louver system; the slope of the canopy is echoed inside the building by the Box Series metal ceilings. The basement, which houses the heart of the library, provides a quiet, warm environment that is enhanced by the sound-absorption qualities of the perforated patterns in the wood and metal ceilings. The perforation allows sound to pass into the ceiling’s sound-absorbent backing material and bagged insulation inside the plenum.

PROJECT: Postma Center, Cutlerville, Mich.

TEAM: Building owner: Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Service, Grand Rapids, Mich., www.pinerest.org // Architect: Integrated Architecture, Grand Rapids, www.intarch.com //
Contractor: Pioneer Construction, Grand Rapids, www.pioneerinc.com // Installer and fabricator: Buist Sheet Metal Co., Grand Rapids, www.buistsheetmetal.com // Manufacturers: Petersen Aluminum Corp., Elk Grove Village, Ill., www.pac-clad.com, and Revere Copper Products Inc., Rome, N.Y., www.reverecopper.com

The 15,500-square-foot Postma Center was transformed from a dilapidated gymnasium into a modern worship and education center. The exterior wall was clad with 5,000 square feet of custom flat-lock wall panels using Revere Copper Products’ EverGreen pre-patinated
copper supplied by Petersen Aluminum. Vertical colored- glass windows are inset in the radius wall at varying heights. Above and below each window opening are Petersen Aluminum’s PAC Composite Panels that are finished in classic bronze and platinum. Approximately 1,800 square feet of the composite panels were utilized. Standing-seam metal roof panels fabricated from 0.032-inch PAC-CLAD coil and finished in dark bronze also were installed along with fascia using Petersen Aluminum’s PAC-3000 CS Composite wall panel system. About 190 feet of curved EverGreen coping, which caps the radius wall, was custom fit and hand cut into 5-foot lengths.

PROJECT: Mayde Creek High School, Cypress, Texas

TEAM: Architect: PBK Inc, Houston, www.pbk.com // General contractor: Century Roofing LLC, Houston, www.centuryroofing.com // Owner: Katy ISD, Houston, www.katy-
isd.org // Manufacturer: CPI Daylighting Inc., Lake Forest, Ill., www.cpidaylighting.com // Representative: Conner-Legrand, Lewisville, Texas, www.conner-legrand.com

For years, vandalism and maintenance challenges led to the structural deterioration of the school’s main glass-block stairwell. A renovation to the main glass-block stairwell was implemented during an addition to the school in summer 2007. After removing thousands of glass blocks, the stairwell. A renovation to the stairwell was implemented with approximately 7,500 square feet of CPI Daylighting’s Quadwall 2 3/4-inch-thick translucent insulated sandwich panel system. To match the restored assembly, the school selected CPI Daylighting’s Green Glazing on the exterior and Ice White on the interior with a custom green CPICRF alumi- num paint. The benefits of the new impact-resistant façade include a natural daylighting feature that is energy efficient, keeping the stairwell cool during the day while still allowing light into the area.

PROJECT: Miami Valley Career Technology Center, Clayton, Ohio

TEAM: Architect: App Architects Inc., Englewood, Ohio, www.app-arch.com // Installer: Spohn Associates Inc., Indianapolis, www.spohnassociates.com // Manufacturer: Dri-Design, Holland, Mich., www.dri-design

The nondescript building that housed the Miami Valley Technology Center was in need of a dramatic facelift to reflect the image of a world-class provider of innovative, high-tech-career education. Approximately 8,500 square feet of 0.063 aluminum Dri-Design panels finished in Arabian blue were used to create a dramatic focal point for the main entry to the entire campus facility. The panels also were used to replace an aging molded fiberglass fascia soffit that extended the length of the building.

PROJECT: Tawes Hall, College Park, University of Maryland

TEAM: Project supervisor: University of Maryland Department of Capital Projects // Roofing contractor: Ruff Roofers Inc., Baltimore, www.ruffroofers.com // Manufacturer: EcoStar, Carlisle, Pa., www.ecostar.carlisle.com

The more than 40-year-old Tawes Hall offered much-needed classroom space to the University of Maryland but was in need of renovations to bring it up to the school’s standards. Included in the plan was the replacement of the building’s existing 60,000-square-foot, multi-sloped concrete-tile roof. Because the school wanted the new roof to blend in with the other campus buildings, EcoStar Majestic Slate tiles in federal gray were chosen. After each section of concrete tile was removed, plywood sheathing was installed over the existing concrete-plank deck. EcoStar’s AquaGuard underlayment was installed over the plywood sheathing, and EcoStar’s Glacier Guard underlayment for water and ice protection was used at the eaves, rakes and valleys.

PROJECT: Mason Middle Shool, Mason, Mich.

TEAM: Building owner: Mason Public Schools, www.mason.k12. mi.us // Roofing contractor: Superior Services R.S.H. Inc., Lansing, Mich., www.superiorservicesrsh.com // Manufacturer: Duro-Last Roofing Inc., Saginaw, Mich., www.duro-last.com

Approximately 70,000 square feet of Duro-Last’s 40-mil, single-ply roof system was used to reroof the building. This product carries a 15-year warranty. The job consisted of vacuuming rock, removing the EPDM and mechanically attaching 3-inch polyiso onto a gypsum deck.

PROJECT: Lister Building, Lovington, N.M.

TEAM: Contractor: Construction Services, a Tecta America Co., Amarillo, Texas, www.constrservices.com // Specifier: Crenshaw Consulting Group, Hobbs, N.M., www.crenshawcg.com // Building owner: Lea County Museum, Lovington, www. leacountymuseum.org // Manufacturer: Firestone Building Products Co., Indianapolis, www.firestonebpco.com

After serving primarily as an unoccupied storage facility for nearly 15 years, the historic Lister Building was purchased by the Lea County Museum to be used as the Lea County Athletic Hall of Fame and feature county history exhibits. The renovation included replacing the aged, badly damaged and leaking built-up roof system. After removing the existing system down to the wood deck, Firestone MB Base sheet was nailed to the surface, followed by a layer of 2 1/2-inch-thick Firestone ISO 95+ polyiso that was mechanically fastened to the deck. Using a multi-purpose cold adhesive, a 1/2-inch high-density polyiso cover board was adhered to the insulation, followed by a Firestone SBS modified bitumen base sheet and a white, granule-surfaced Firestone SBS FR cap sheet.

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